Romeoville Humane Society

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Where Community and Pets Matter

The Indoor Cat Manual:
Some interesting little pointers from Ohio State University Veterinary Studies.

Pet Expertise Dog Training Guide:
With a value of $7.50 or more, this guide is our gift to you to help you to enjoy your dog to the fullest! We would love it if you would read this dog training book and recommend it to your friends.

   Download Dog Training E-Book Now

This positive dog training guide is the result of years of dog training experience and is a wonderful way to get started training your dog while having fun.


Please visit www.petexpertise.com for more wonderful training help.

Cat Care

Although your cat may act independent and be litter-trained, he still counts on you to provide him with food, water, safe shelter, regular veterinary care, companionship, and more. Take care of these ten essentials, and you'll be guaranteed to develop a rewarding relationship with your feline companion.

  • Outfit your cat with a microchip collar and ID tag that includes your name, address, and telephone number. No matter how careful you are, there's a chance your companion may sneak out of the door—a microchip and ID tag greatly increase the chance that your cat will be returned home safely.
  • Follow local cat registration laws. Licensing, registration and identification systems administered by your local governing authority protect both cats and people in the community.
  • Keep your cat indoors. Keeping your cat safely confined at all times is best for you, your pet, and your community.
  • Take your cat to the veterinarian for regular check-ups. If you do not have a veterinarian, ask your local animal shelter or a pet-owning friend for a referral.
  • Spay or neuter your pet. This will keep her healthier and will reduce the problem of cat overpopulation.
  • Give your cat a nutritionally balanced diet, including constant access to fresh water. Ask your veterinarian for advice on what and how often to feed your pet.
  • Undesirable behaviors such as scratching furniture, jumping on countertops, spraying and inappropriate urination are behaviors you can minimize. There are various ways you can deter them from these behaviors by providing a stimulating or “natural” environment to them.
  • Groom your cat often to keep her coat healthy, soft, and shiny. Although it is especially important to brush long-haired cats to prevent their hair from matting, even short-haired felines need to be groomed to remove as much loose hair as possible. When cats groom themselves, they ingest a great deal of hair, which often leads to hairballs.
  • Set aside time to play with your cat. While cats do not need the same level of exercise that dogs do, enjoying regular play sessions with your pet will provide him with the physical exercise and mental stimulation he needs, as well as strengthen the bond you share.
  • Be loyal to and patient with your cat. Make sure the expectations you have of your companion are reasonable and remember that the vast majority of behavior problems can be solved. If you are struggling with your pet's behavior, contact your veterinarian or local animal shelter for advice, and check out the HSUS's Pets for Life campaign information.

Training Tips

There is no one sure fire way to train a pet that works for everyone. Here are some ideas that you can try.

Dog Care

Your dog gives you a lifetime of unconditional love, loyalty, and friendship. In return, they count on you to provide them with food, water, safe shelter, regular veterinary care, exercise, companionship, and more. Take care of these ten essentials, and you'll be guaranteed to develop a rewarding relationship with your canine companion.

  • Outfit your dog with a microchip, collar, and ID tag that includes your name, address, and telephone number. No matter how careful you are there is a chance your companion may become lost—a microchip and ID tag greatly increase the chance that your pet will be returned safely.
  • Follow local laws for licensing your dog and vaccinating him for rabies. Check with your local animal shelter or humane society for information regarding legal requirements, where to obtain tags, and where to have your pet vaccinated.
  • Follow this simple rule—off property, on leash. Even a dog with a valid license, rabies tag, and ID tag should not be allowed to roam outside of your home or fenced yard. It is best for you, your community, and your dog to keep your pet under control at all times, as in many communities, not doing this can result in a monetary fine.
  • Give your dog proper shelter. A fenced yard with a doghouse is a bonus, especially for large and active dogs; however, dogs should never be left outside alone or for extended periods of time. Dogs need and crave companionship and should spend most of their time inside with their family.
  • Take your dog to the veterinarian for regular check-ups
  • Spay or neuter your dog. Dogs that have this routine surgery tend to live longer, be healthier, and have fewer behavior problems. By spaying or neutering your dog, you are also doing your part to reduce the problem of pet overpopulation.
  • Give your dog a nutritionally balanced diet, including constant access to fresh water. Ask your veterinarian for advice on what and how often to feed your pet.
  • Enroll your dog in a training class. Positive training will allow you to control your companion's behavior safely and humanely, and the experience offers a terrific opportunity to enhance the bond you share with your dog.
  • Give your dog enough exercise to keep him physically fit (but not exhausted). Most dog owners find that playing with their canine companion, along with walking him at least twice a day, provides sufficient exercise. If you have questions about the level of exercise appropriate for your dog, please consult your veterinarian.
  • Be patient and loyal to your faithful companion. Make sure the expectations you have of your dog are reasonable and remember that the vast majority of behavior problems can be solved. If you are struggling with your pet's behavior, contact your veterinarian or local animal shelter for advice, and check out The HSUS' Pets for Life campaign information.